[D8828ABH1], Letter from James Ricalton to Alfred Ord Tate, April 24th, 1888

https://edisondigital.rutgers.edu/document/D8828ABH1

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Title

[D8828ABH1], Letter from James Ricalton to Alfred Ord Tate, April 24th, 1888

Editor's Notes

"I cable this day the word "Eureka", implying that--"I have found it," that is the bamboo desired. In making five carbon[unclear] tests it for [unclear] not only the [unclear] but also the sample of extra which I brought with me and which Mr. Edison said was entirely satisfactory. ### It is the "Giant Bamboo" and is sometimes a foot in diameter. The joints run from 10 inches to 25 inches in length. I believe it can be supplied in quantities of 20 million fibres annually, probably much more. It acquires a growth of 6 or 7 inches in diameter in eight years. ### I have tested many different john and bamboo fibres here but find nothing approaching the Giant in all the essential size of fiber length +joint hardiness [unclear[ etc. ### It is found in different parts of the island, but I believe it is indigineous to Northern Burmah. ### I find an abundance of the ordinary bamboo 4 and 5 inches in diameter and in line tests that I made more than equall the 'regular.' I will make a final test in a few days and if [unclear] accordingly. ### If the test of the laboratory sustains my test of smple sent today marked 'Sample (1) [unclear]. I shall assist your instructions as to arrangements for shifting how much to pay per million fibres, etc. etc. ### I think it will be scarcely practicable to get the natives here to shift into small fibers I think it will be better to have the joints of it into sections inch as I send in sample (except its cut-off the [unclear] wood) to dried and packed in boxes or packaged it would [unclear] long to day the joints and this fiber would [unclear] if not dried." ### Anticipating possible instructions I enclose a brief supplement by our code. ### Ceylon is a better bamboo [unclear] than I notice- I have been informed in [unclear] that Burmah and Java are better [unclear] for the bamboo than [unclear]. ### I arrived in Columbia on the second of [unclear] and tried the [unclear] in about [unclear] for lumber. ### I have not written sooner because I had nothing to write. ### Feb. March + April are the hottest months in Ceylon so I came into the [unclear] heat of an unusually hot and dry season to heat ranging between 85 and 95 but I stand it well. Awaiting instructions."

Recipient

Date

1888-04-24

Decade

1880-1889

Type

Folder/Volume ID

D8828-F

Microfilm ID

122:817

Document ID

D8828ABH1

Publisher

Thomas A. Edison Papers, School of Arts and Sciences, Rutgers University
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