[X001M2AL], Letter from Wilson Stout Howell to Edison Machine Works, September 13th, 1888

Item

Abstract

[copy written from Newburgh] The 1750 ft of #168 feeder the laying of which was completed on the 1th inst. was put into service last evening with a very small load, and worked properly. ##Before laying, each tube was tested for grounds and crosses and all defective or suspicious lengths rejected or repaired after jointing, and before compound was run into boxes, tests were made for grounds and crosses and all faults immediately removed. Each night, after compound had cooled, the whole as far as laid was tested for grounds, brakes and continuity. ## The result of the final test of insulation gave us an insulation resistance all around, of between five and six megaohms, estimated from deflections of galvanmeter the value of which is known. The method of listing is as follows viz. Single tubes were listed before laying with four cells of battery and a high resistance galvano meter (#265 on Bergman Hess's list) Each wire was tlisted to the iron tube and to each other wire in all 49 readings on each inst. Being virtually a double reading on each conductor. ##Frequent tests in same manner were made as work progressed before any untested joints were compounded. ##After compound had been run into boxes at end of each days work, (compound allowed to cool before testing) a more careful list was made on the whole line as far as them laid, using as battery the dynamos current taken from the (+) and (-) bus wires in the station which gave us an E.M.F. of 270 volts at full load. In order to prevent any damage in case of short current or ground, three 16 c/p new type Edison lamps, (listed at factory to give 10 c/p at 107 volts) were put in circuit in series with battery and galvometer (taken out of Lamp Co. volt meters, box pattern). When used in volt meter this galvanometer gives about 3/10" deflection for one volt. The greatest deflection noticed was between (+) and (-) conductors of tube, said deflection being about 3/16 of an inch from zero. ##The insulation of pressure wires is much higher, no deflection being noticed from some of them. ##The insulation of pressure wires is much higher, no deflection being noticed from some of them. The insolulation to earth was almost perfect excepting only an (+) pressure wire in which case we got a minute deflection. ##A strong deflection between ground and (+ -) conductor appeared on Friday but disappeared when dynamos current was applied through the resistance lamps, bringing lamps up to slight red for an instant. In our opinion the insulation of the whole line is extremely high and Mr. Hagadorn is to be complemented on the results. Very truly yours, Wilson S. Howell Inspector Copy of Report to Edison machine works,

Date

1888-09-13

Decade

1880-1889

Type

Identifier

X001M2AL

Folder Set

X001M2

Title

[X001M2AL], Letter from Wilson Stout Howell to Edison Machine Works, September 13th, 1888

Microfilm ID

Publisher

Thomas A. Edison Papers, School of Arts and Sciences, Rutgers University

Timestamp

September 13, 1888